Home Arts & Entertainment Panic! at the Disco makes stop in GR

Panic! at the Disco makes stop in GR

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By DJ DeSmyter
Collegiate Staff Writer

Fans began lining up outside the Intersection at least three hours early to secure front row spots to see their favorite Las Vegas-based band, Panic! at the Disco, up close and personal.

Exploding onto the music scene in 2005 with their debut album “A Fever You Can’t Sweat Out,” Panic! at the Disco quickly gained a following, earning them the Video of the Year award at the 2006 MTV Video Music Awards for their song “I Write Sins Not Tragedies.” Since their debut, Panic! has released a live recording and two studio albums, including their latest effort, “Vices and Virtues.”

As fans waited for Panic! to take the stage, they were treated to two opening bands: Number the Stars and Foxy Shazam. Both were met with mediocre responses, but the audience seemed to enjoy the acoustic guitar-driven set of Number the Stars more than Foxy Shazam, who seemed to have based their set around crazy antics and jokes that were never meant to be funny.

But the second the members of Panic! at the Disco strutted on stage, the audience went crazy and forgot all about the openers. Excited screams and exclamations of love for the band filled the Intersection, and as soon as the music started, the crowd quieted down and began immersing themselves in what was to be an energetic spectacle.

Kicking off their set with “Ready to Go (Get Me Out of My Mind)” from the album “Vices and Virtues,” Panic! at the Disco set the bar high for the rest of the show. Lead vocalist Brendon Urie wasted no time showing off his impressive range and strength, and his vocal versatility was beautifully illustrated in songs like “Trade Mistakes” and “Always,” a song he dedicated to his fiancé’s parents who were in attendance.

Newer members of the band, bassist Dallon Weekes and lead guitarist Ian Crawford both proved not only are they talented musicians, made evident by their intricate guitar solos, they are also perfect additions to the Panic! family. Weekes, in particular, stood out as he interacted with the crowd by throwing picks and turning his microphone around to amplify their singing. The only member not adequately featured was drummer Spencer Smith. Urie, however, had the audience eating out of the palm of his hands with his funny, nonsensical stories and jokes.

With three albums under their belt, the band played a healthy mixture of old and new songs. However, songs from their first album, like “I Write Sins Not Tragedies” and “Time to Dance,” garnered the loudest shrieks and sing-alongs. The band even covered Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep” and The Darkness’ “I Believe in a Thing Called Love,” which were both met with much enthusiasm and further illustrated Urie’s vocal strength.

Even though the set was well-balanced, it was not the most fluid. On a number of occassions, the band walked offstage while members of their crew changed guitars and removed instruments that were no longer needed. These awkward breaks stilted the overall flow of the show. The fans didn’t seem to mind though, hey just kept on cheering.

Despite the awkward pauses, the band continued to carry the show with fervor and professionalism, keeping the audience both entertained and awestruck. Many left the show with smiles spread across their faces as they flocked to the merchandise booth to buy items to commemorate the evening.

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