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New year, new you?

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This year, ditch that standard resolution about exercise, and let your creative juices flow. We're not saying you have to skip the gym; we're just saying these 10 things are worth committing to in 2019 and happen to have nothing to do with a treadmill.

By Lillian Linscott

With a new year comes new goals and expectations for the year ahead. New Year’s resolutions are nothing new. According to the History Channel website, ancient Babylonians began this phenomenon an approximated 4,000 years ago and it has become a tradition that has continued through time and across the world. According to research referenced in the article, nearly 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions each year.

As students face the new year, they talked to The Collegiate about their hopes and what they will be facing. A common thread with students was their hope to do well in the new semester and to better themselves mentally.

“A lot of my New Year’s resolutions this year have to do with selfcare,” said GRCC student Taylor Bazen, 21, of Grand Rapids. “Try to be a little more gracious with myself and not be so focused on other people that I let myself get left in the dust.”

Some students, like Boone Shangle, 19, of Walker, Michigan shared with The Collegiate that they had no resolutions. These students did however have big hopes and excitement for the New Year.

“I don’t really have any New Year’s resolutions, a lot of times I just take it as it comes,” Shangle said. “I’m hoping I pass this semester. I am currently hoping to graduate with three degrees. I hope college becomes cheaper.”

The tradition of making New Year’s resolutions provides people with a time to look back on their year, to discover what they wish to change, within themselves or their environment, and to change it.

“Keeping a strict reading schedule and homework schedule because while it feels like a heavy workload in the moment, by the end of the semester if feels worth it,” said Kaylee Fex, 18, of Grand Rapids.

Another GRCC student, Jenna Vanklompenberg, 22, of Grand Rapids, said that she also hoped to prioritize and be more productive.

“I hope this year is filled with success, time with friends and family are spent well, always motivating myself to chase after Christ,” VanKlompenberg said. “My hope is to try to find a job regarding photography sometime this year. I’d love to do some traveling as well.”

It seems likely that a tradition that began thousands of years ago will continue on for many more generations, allowing people a time to reflect and create goals.