Home Featured Review Like A Black Widow Baby: A Review Of “Black Widow”

Like A Black Widow Baby: A Review Of “Black Widow”

4857
0
A column header designed for night Light by Jamie Miller, a culmination of reviews and opinions from a night owl (Abby Haywood/The Collegiate)

By Jamie Miller

Greetings Nightlighters, it is I, “the wannabe avenger” Jamie Miller here with yet another issue of Nightlight. Now, as you know by now, I am a huge fan of superheroes. Comics, movies, TV shows, I just can’t get enough. One film series I always enjoyed is “The Avengers.”  So imagine my joy when I learned one of their most underrated members, Natasha Romanoff, aka The Black Widow, was getting her own movie. I was overjoyed. She got her own movie, and it only took them 11 years! That being said, was it worth the wait? Well read on to find out.

“Black Widow,” which takes place in between “Captain America: Civil War” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” tells the tale of what Romanoff was up to at that time. No longer a card carrying Avenger, and being hunted by the U.S. government due to having helped the fugitive Steve Rogers, Romanoff has become a fugitive herself. With few allies, even fewer options and being hunted, Romanoff will be dragged into a fight that makes aliens and Norse god’s look like child’s play. This fight will force her to confront the ghosts of her past – ghosts that seek nothing short of her utter destruction.

The film stars Scarlett Johansson returning to the role that arguably made her famous, that being the role of the superspy/assassin Natasha Romanoff, aka The Black Widow. Along for the ride are Florence Pugh of “Midsommar” and “Fighting with My Family” in the role of Yelena Belova, a fellow super spy/assassin, also known as a Black Widow and Natasha’s adopted younger sister. David Harbour, known around the world as Jim Hopper in “Stranger Things,” plays the part of Alexei Shostakov/The Red Guardian, a washed up super soldier and would-be Russian counterpart to Captain America and adopted father figure to Romanoff and Belova. Rachel Weisz, known from such films as “The Mummy” and “Oz The Great And Powerful,” plays the part of Melina Vostokoff, an older Black Widow and Romanoff and Belova’s adopted mother figure. Ray Winstone, known from movies such as “Snow White and The Huntsman,” plays the role of Dreykov. Dreykov is a psychotic, vicious and cruel Russian general, and the man who created the Red Room which spawned Romanoff, Belova and others. Ever Anderson, known for “Resident Evil: The Final Chapter”, and is also the daughter of actress Milla Jovovich and director Paul W.S. Anderson, plays a younger Romanoff.

All in all this movie was pretty good. The fight scenes are phenomenal, if a tad bit unrealistic as my fellow collegiate staffer Sean let me know. But then again, it is a superhero movie. The acting was well done. It also has one of the best opening credits I’ve seen in a very long time. If I had one complaint it’s Taskmaster. An awesome villain and occasional antihero in the comics, Taskmaster can mimic the fighting styles and movements of anyone he has seen. Yet, in the movie Taskmaster is nothing more than a glorified enforcer. Save for one somewhat good twist, Taskmaster is just… there. Other than that, however, the movie was good. I give it a solid six and a half torches out of 10. I recommend it to superhero fans and casual viewers alike.